Tuesday, 11 November 2014

Crescent of four, St Marychurch, Torquay

Remember my three little cottages in a row, from a couple of weeks ago? Well, reader Michael went one better and sent me this listed crescent for sale.
Park Crescent in pretty St Marychurch, built in the 1840s and Grade II-listed, is available for sale as four individual homes or as the whole terrace.
As with the Suffolk terrace, they're a complicated group but I'll try and unpick things.
The owner of the Crescent occupies no2 (left end of row, above) but that's up for sale too.
The middle houses - Nos 4 and 6 - the agent's details say had planning consent for use as a nursing home. However, I couldn't find any record of consent given by Torbay Council but some historical references to there being a nursing home in that area in the 1950s and 60s. Anyhow, the properties have had joining walls removed and rooms turned into ensuite bedrooms.
No 8 had been a former vicarage and, from the outside at least, looks like the most dilapidated of the group:


No 8 also has the largest plot of land - all the houses have long front gardens, but only 4,6 and 8 have land at the rear (No 2 has a courtyard). No 8 also has this coach house:

And four bedrooms, one with a dressing room, and a bathroom upstairs; hall, cloakroom, lounge, dining room, breakfast room and kitchen downstairs. I think it may be my favourite.
However, there are no internal pix to judge the work needed (drives me mad that agents measure rooms but don't take photos!).
No 2 is chunkier but, well, odd: three big reception rooms downstairs, then three small rooms and the bathroom; three big bedrooms on the first floor; three more above, presumably in the loft; other rooms below ground level. 
Nos 4 and 6 have eight bedrooms between them and a whole bunch of sitting rooms and dining rooms and bathrooms and stuff, and this lovely orchard at the back:


The properties are for sale by informal tender through Drew Pearce. No guide price but two-three bed terraced houses around it are going for £150k-£160k.
Details here, more on the pdf here, and on Zoopla here.


Tuesday, 4 November 2014

Two Bankes estate cob cottages, Dorset

Cob, bap or bread cake? Where I'm from it's bread cake. Where I live it's cob. Bloke I'm married to insists on bap. Do you reckon there are other countries where your roots are revealed by the naming of your sandwich?
Anyway, these are altogether different types of cobs - traditional Dorset cob and thatch cottages.
They're being sold off by the National Trust, as more unwanted bits of the Bankes estate bequeathed to the Trust along with Kingston Lacy*
Both properties are up for sale by informal tender by noon THIS FRIDAY (November 7th), both with a guide price of £325k.
Pricey given the amount of restoration work needed, but they're both detached, three bedrooms on good size plots within Colehill's green belt.
Pictured top is the cottage at Wimborne. Downstairs is the entrance hall/dining room, plus lounge, kitchen, study and ground floor bathroom


Upstairs are three  bedrooms. Outside is around .6 of an acre of land, plus storage sheds.


The second property, Mountain Ash, is the detached cottage below, more-or-less its neighbour but Google and postcodes weren't clear.


Slightly smaller property but slightly bigger plot of land. Sitting room, kitchen and shower room downstairs, three bedrooms upstairs. Nice views from the garden/jungle.


Both properties are for sale through Hearnes. Details here and on Zoopla here or property one, and here and here for property two.

* The 1981 Bankes estate donation has attracted controversy. Reclusive old bloke, living in four rooms of his decrepit stately home, deeds everything to the National Trust on his death - every acre, brick and priceless painting, despite having living heirs. Mentioned here, but not here.


Tuesday, 28 October 2014

Three little cottages, all in a row

Three Suffolk cottages to show you today. Although given that they're part of a terrace of four, you could look at this as potentially one property, or two.
Anyway, they came to me via Wreck reader Wendy, who wrote:
I have been an avid follower of your blog for a good few months. Upon my travels today I happened upon these 3 properties – the thing I found interesting is that they were up until last month council houses – they will cost the council too much to bring up to decent homes again so they are selling them off. I hope someone buys them and turns it in to one home.
If it were me (and assuming a sudden windfall), I'd buy the three; do up and rent or sell No 2, and turn Nos 3 and 4 into my three/four bedroom village home.
Sorry, getting a bit ahead of myself there. Let me show you some pictures.
At the top of the post are Nos 3 and No 4, below is No 2 (No 1 isn't for sale and looks to be occupied)


Here's the back of the terrace (No 1 is the house on the far right):

Notice those gates in the garden fences near to the houses? Have another look at the middle photo. There's a right of way across the properties to the side of No 1.
Not unusual in old houses (these date from 1550 - crikey!) but unless you manage to move it (say, to the end of everyone's garden?) you're not going to be able to extend the properties - and you're going to have to put up with your neighbour dragging their bins and garden rubbish past your window.
These are pretty land-locked properties so getting rid of the ROW is unlikely to be an option:


Each house is Grade II listed with a similar layout - a hall, living room and kitchen downstairs, two bedrooms and a bathroom upstairs. Aside from some lively decor, they all look in reasonable nick.

No 2

No 3

No 4
They're in the Suffolk village of Elmswell, around 16 miles from Ipswich.
All three properties are up for auction on November 20th, through TW Gaze, each with a guide price of £110-£130k. Details here and Rightmove links here, here and here.

Friday, 24 October 2014

Laird's manse, Yell, Shetland

This is The Haa. Aside from the absolutely fabulous house name, it's in a place called Gloup, on Yell. Shetland SO does names!
The Haa is a gorgeous, faded Grade B listed former laird's home in a lovely location on the largest of the North Isles.


The Haa has had it's price reduced - to offers around £100k. Mad!
Here's some pictures:


I noticed the labels - marked for sale or auction perhaps? The price includes carpets and curtains and some of the furniture is also for sale.
There are signs of damp in some rooms and the house only has single-glazed windows and storage heaters. But the original doors, window shutters and other details are lovely.
Downstairs is the hall (with a bathroom off it), two reception rooms, study, kitchen and two walk-in stores/utility.
The first floor has two grand bedrooms with a second, shared bathroom. The large attic has a third bedroom (fitted out with cute box beds) and a second space used for storage.
Outside is an overgrown garden and parking area.
It's on the market through agents Neil Risk, details here.

Monday, 20 October 2014

Two wrecks, North Yorkshire and Northumberland

I thought I'd lump these two together because, aside from location, they have much in common.
Neither of them have internal photos - which means I'm sending a yah boo! to the agents because I hate it when they just stick up a couple of pix of the building and the garden and leave it at that.
I mean it's not like they haven't actually been inside - property one (above) has room descriptions and sizes.
Although sticking metal shutters over the windows (property two) would make it a tad difficult to take photos inside.
The other thing they have in common is that they're both handsome, period coach houses or lodges now in need of a lot of work.
Vine Cottage, above, at Bolton-on-Swale, about 8 miles from Northallerton is the pricier at offers over £250k.
However the former coachhouse comes with gardens, three acres of paddock, stable and part-wrecked stone outbuildings:


The house has three bedrooms, kitchen, two reception rooms. Bathroom is downstairs tho'.
It's on the market through Charltons, details here and on Zoopla here.
Glebelands Lodge is in the rather lovely Alnwick, in Northumberland:


The Grade II listed building is single storey, 19th century Gothic, with a handsome drive (albeit sharing a right of way with its neighbours) and stunning windows.


It's on the market through Sanderson Young with a guide price of £180k. Details here.